Book Spotlight: On the Come Up

Reading

Every once in a while, I read a book that inspires me, makes me think, or really just captivates me through the entire story. Most of the time when I come across one of these books  I hide away in my room and binge read, only coming up for air to eat and use the bathroom. All other daily tasks are put on hold until the book is finished.

Angie Thomas’ On The Come Up (OTCU) was that book for me this past Sunday. I managed to read the ENTIRE book in one day. Now, I will say, the last time I read an entire book in one day was also the work of Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give (THUG). Now, this post will be about OTCU, but I also want to point out the importance of both books.

OTCU follows the life of Bri, a teenager trying to find her place in the world while also struggling to help her family keep their lights on. She can write, she can rap, her dad was a famous underground rapper, so she sets out to make a name for her self too, thinking this will be her big break to help her family finally “make it.” But what Bri doesn’t calculate into her plan is the media and her image. She doesn’t plan for people to call her ghetto and ratchet. She doesn’t plan to be labeled a hoodlum and a threat to society for sticking up for herself. She just wants to make it by any means necessary.

Throughout the book, we see everything through Bri’s eyes and we are able to see what she’s trying to tell the world, but we also see how the world isn’t attempting to listen to what she has to say. Instead, we see how they are quick to make judgments and place her into the “ghetto black girl” stereotype. But enough of all the summarizing, it’s time to move on to the fun part, if you want to know more, READ THE BOOK!

One of the main components I love about Thomas’ books is the way she writes them. Yes, I know that may seem like a well “duh Jasmine” statement, but it’s rare to find a writer who can paint vivid pictures and transport the reader into the world of the book. From the moment I started reading the book, I was no longer sitting on my bed, I was walking around “the Garden” with Bri, I was going to school with Bri, I was on stage with Bri. It’s an incredible feeling to be so entranced by words on a page that you lose the sense of time and reality.

The other main reason I love OTCU and THUG are for their significance in black culture. To have a black, female author write two books that deal with issues the black community is dealing with right now is huge. From police brutality to gang influence in the community, to overcoming poverty and addiction, to racism and beyond, Angie Thomas has created books that resonate with the struggles of POC today.

These books aren’t just important for POC though, everyone should read these. If they make you uncomfortable good, they need to. Let these books open up discussions you’re afraid to have. Talk about the issues in the book. Listen to what people have to say. It might shock you to learn how people have connected or learned from these stories.

I would like to end this by saying thank you to Ms. Angie Thomas. I know you might not ever see this post, and I know that our paths may never cross, but I just want to say thank you. Thank you for lighting the flame in my soul to get back out and write again. Thank you for using your platform to speak on issues most people are afraid to speak on. Thank you for inspiring me to finally tell my story. To quote Bri, “you can’t stop me nope, nope.”


“Your voices matter, your dreams matter, your lives matter. Be the roses that grow in the concrete. “

Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give